TVG: Robert Lee Kilpatrick. BioPartnering Future Europe celebrating 20 years of partnering




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Video title: TVG: Robert Lee Kilpatrick. BioPartnering Future Europe celebrating 20 years of partnering
Released on: November 05, 2012. © PharmaTelevision Ltd
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In this episode of PharmaTelevision News Review, filmed at BioPartnering Future Europe, Fintan Walton talks to Robert Lee Kilpatrick, CEO and Founder of the Technology Vision Group
Robert's perspective: Changes in biotech industry over the past 20 years
Fintan Walton:
Hello and welcome to PharmaTelevision News Review here at BioPartnering Future Europe, On this show I have Robert Kilpatrick, who is President, CEO and Founder of the Technology Vision Group (TVG), welcome.
Robert Lee Kilpatrick:
Thank you.
Fintan Walton:
Robert, it's a pleasure to have you on this show, because your company was the one of the first companies to set up a partnering event here in Europe, could you just tell us a little bit about the history of that?
Robert Lee Kilpatrick:
You know Fintan we were actually the first company to set up partnering in Europe. In 1992 when Bill Clinton and Al Gore were elected, I was contacted by the Vice President through the US Commerce Department, asking us to organize what was then the world's first biopharma partnering event in London, and BIO didn't even exist as an organization at that time, so we were the only one.
Fintan Walton:
Incredible. So the Vice President of United States asked you, Robert, to do something about, setting up, increasing the communication between biotech companies in the US and Europe, looking at the European opportunity?
Robert Lee Kilpatrick:
Yes the Vice President I think is well known now for having been a strong advocate of IT and biotech as drivers of global innovation and he saw that as a, I think a strength of the United States economy at that time and the decision was taken to build bridges between US biotech companies and European, because in 1992 that's where most biotech companies where.
Fintan Walton:
Right, so you were introduced to the ambassador, is that right in London?
Robert Lee Kilpatrick:
Yes, the Honorable Raymond Seitz was the Ambassador at that time and we worked with him and at that time the Head of the Trade and Industry, Department of Trade and Industry in the UK, Lord Sainsbury from those supermarket family.
Fintan Walton:
Right. Yes, exactly.
Robert Lee Kilpatrick:
And there we worked with the British government, and the US government to make that happen.
Fintan Walton:
Right, and that was the start with that?
Robert Lee Kilpatrick:
Yes.
Fintan Walton:
And so now you are sort of celebrating your, celebrating the 20th year of doing this, and for all of those years you were based in London and now you are based in Brussels?
Robert Lee Kilpatrick:
This year we are, indeed.
Fintan Walton:
Right, and could you just, I mean obviously part of this Robert as you've experienced the biotech industry, you know you've seen, you've been on the journey, so just some reference to your own experience of how you have seen the industry change over the last 20-years and then you know why we are now back here in, why we are here in Brussels really?
Robert Lee Kilpatrick:
Those are good questions Fintan. If I think about it there have been such incredibly profound changes in the biotech industry. And if we go back to 1992, a moment ago I said biotech was largely a US and European phenomenon and we can drill down a bit deeper and say well it was largely West Coast, California, San Diego, and San Francisco, where I am from, and East Coast, largely Boston, and a little bit in Princeton and places like that, and then in Europe in 1992 the UK was definitely the strongest one, hence having it in London and then Germany, parts of Germany, and France were, and Switzerland were trailing a bit. You could say then in 1992 biotech was not a global phenomenon, it was a highly regionalized, it was a Western European and American thing. So 20-years later it's completely global, now biotech companies and pharma companies are now looking for deals and innovation on an international scale, Asia, Latin America, and we have events now in Europe, in Latin America, in Brazil, The United States, and Canada, in India, in China, in Australia. So I think that's the biggest change global, and it's partly global because there is a global awareness of problems, so whether it's human health, or animal health, or plant health, or food, energy, materials, industrial, so that's another change, in 20-years we've gone from largely human therapeutics drugs to basically the entire bioeconomy.
Biopartnering Future Europe's Vision for Europe program-Horizon 2020
Fintan Walton:
So clearly you've moved from London to Brussels and today we are sitting here at this event for the first time in Brussels, what's different?
Robert Lee Kilpatrick:
Well the first thing that's different is that, apart from the fact it's in Brussels and one could argue that chocolates are better, the beer is different, of course I like English beer with Belgium beer particularly the Trappist beer is good. Brussels is because of the commission, you know one of the capitals of Europe, and certainly it's the economic capital from a government perspective, because the commission sets a lot of the rules and regulations for industrial activity in Europe and they have a lot of funds for the life science industry. We've changed the name of the conference a little bit, we tweaked it by adding the word future, we did that because the commission has a vision, a strong vision for a new Europe in 2020 and that with program called Horizon 2020 which sets out a whole series of steps about how Europe is going to become more of a knowledge based economy by 2020, there is an attempt into increase the life span by two-years of all Europeans citizens, and life science is going to be a center piece of this new knowledge based economy, so there is a vision of a future Europe. So the commission had come to us as EuropaBio had done and many of the National Biotech Associations in Europe, SwedenBIO, Norway, Finland, Belgium, Denmark and they said we would like to use BioPartnering Europe or BioPartnering Future Europe to basically create an opportunity to make Europe more globally competitive, no event in Europe that exists now, including our own or any others, brings all of Europe together at the level of academia, government, biotech, pharma, foundations, research institutes and that is our goal with European partners to make BioPartnering Future Europe the showcase of all European life science for partnering not only within Europe, but with the rest of the world.
Rising Star Awards, Rate the Pharma Awards and other initiatives
Fintan Walton:
Okay, so in this conference there are few innovations something's like the Rising Star Awards, there is Rate the Pharma Awards and so forth, tell us a little bit about those initiatives?
Robert Lee Kilpatrick:
Well you know Fintan, the event business is highly competitive and there is over capacity in this market, lot of the events were created when you know the markets were high, when there was plenty money around and we have to innovate ourselves, so we've decided to introduce a whole series of changes that help the stakeholders get their work done effectively, and two other things we've introduced firstly is Rising Star, which is an award that was given yesterday to a company from Texas, who won in Brussels, MacuCLEAR, who has a special treatment I think for dry and wet eye macular degeneration. I listened to the presentation and it was very good, and they and three other companies were selected by a panel of judges including Pam Demain from Merck, Bill Kridel from Ferghana, and Denise Pollard-Knight from Phase4. And the idea was that they chose four of the top companies from the total number of presenters and then we had a kind of a realty show experience where each of the four gave a presentation in front of the audience and before the judges, and then the judges asked them questions. The judges gave great feedback on the quality of the presentation, the clarity, as well as the business plan, that's the way of helping I think biotech presenters up their game, that to pay more attention to what they are doing and not say pull a presentation off-of a-shelf and give the same one. And then we have another one called Rate the Pharma, because we want to level the playing field, and the biotech CEO's we talk to say you know we are endlessly being judged by big pharma, we'd like to judge them and give them some feedback, so we circulated an anonymous questionnaire using SurveyMonkey and we asked them to rate pharma's based on communication skills, on commercialization capabilities et cetera, and I am in fact running a panel today with Jonathan de Pass, who is the CEO of EvaluatePharma, and John Hodgson from Scrip and we are going to talk about that, and we are going to give a lot of a free consulting to the pharma companies here and they are going to get feedback on what the biotech CEO's like and don't like about them.
Fintan Walton:
Okay, that's going to be fascinating?
Robert Lee Kilpatrick:
Yes.
Plans over next five years
Fintan Walton:
Right, just let's look at, we were talking about future Europe and we talk about BioPartnering Future Europe and what's next, you are here in Brussels, what are the plans for the next five-years?
Robert Lee Kilpatrick:
Well this year was a transition year in many ways Fintan, we after 19-years decided to leave and come to the continent, that in itself has been a huge logistical change. When we were in London, TVG was always completely in charge of the conference, we could kind of do what we wanted and there was freedom in that, the limitation of course was that we couldn't get you know movers and shakers on the ground in Europe to help us and some of the other events have relationships with some of the biotech associations who bring delegations that's useful. So this year we came to Brussels, we worked with the consortium of nine groups, three in Wallonia, three in Flanders, three in Brussels, and it was challenging, the Wallonian's and the Flemish don't even speak the same language, for a year Belgium didn't have a national government, so we were suddenly in a position where we were working with nine other groups in partnership, at the same time we were working with the European Commission, with EuropaBio, with the European Biopharmaceutical Enterprises group, lots of other people and we have concrete plans to build a pipeline for this event out five-years, so we've announced that we will be Stockholm next year, so simultaneously we are working with Norway, Finland, Sweden, and Denmark and their constituent regions, and constituent companies like Novo Nordisk and Novozymes. We are going to be in Basel, Switzerland in 2014. We are working with the consortium both in the Basel area but within all of Switzerland, and I can't announce it today but we have two more regions taking us out beyond that. That's a lot for a company that has historically only been in California to have all these relationships in Europe, so we appointed Olivier Duchamp, Managing Director of TVG Europe and he is building a team here, we are very excited about that, he has done a fantastic job. This year our goal was to make the transition and hold our own, and we came in at about 800 people, to be honest with you we had hoped for a 1000, but the economy is about as bad as I have ever seen it and I think that in talking to the pharmaceutical companies and our stakeholders everybody is very happy to keep with us and move forward. So we have a grand vision of using BioPartnering Future Europe to help the commission, implement it's Horizon 2020 plan to bring all of Europe together over the next 24 months, so that by the time we get to Switzerland we have pretty much everybody from those strands that I talked about, academia, government, industry et cetera to partner with themselves. We believe that partnering, more partnering in Europe should happen and that will make Europe more globally competitive and then we will bring the Asians, and the Latin Americans, and the North Americans, and the Arabians, and the Africans to Europe and that will really make Europe more globally competitive, we will see a lot more deal flow. So that's the grand vision, but you know "The devil is in the details" that's a lot of work, it's a big change.
Fintan Walton:
Robert Kilpatrick, thank you very much indeed for coming on the show.
Robert Lee Kilpatrick:
Thanks Fintan.
Fintan Walton
Dr Fintan Walton is the Founder and CEO of PharmaVentures . After completing his doctoral research on the genetics of cell proliferation at the University of Michigan(US)and Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland), Dr Walton gained broad commercial experience in biotechnology in management positions at Bass and Celltech plc (1982-1992).
Robert Lee Kilpatrick
President
At the time of recording this PTV interview Robert Lee Kilpatrick serves as Co-Founder and Partner of Technology Vision Group LLC (TVG). Dr. Robert Lee Kilpatrick is Co-Founder and Partner of Technology Vision GroupLLC (TVG). Since 1992, Dr. Kilpatrick along with TVG has been connecting innovators and leaders in the life science industry across the US, Canada, China, Europe, Australia, Latin America, India, and Asia. The 18-year track record of success is founded by deep industry knowledge, integrity in business, and powerful network of valuable relationships - fulfilling the vision to be Your Global Life Science Network". Dr. Kilpatrick was educated at the University of California, Berkeley and Cambridge University, where he received a Doctorate in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine. He is on the Board of Directors of the BayBio Institute, a non-profit think tank in San Francisco focused on issues related to the bio-economy. Professional memberships include: BayBio Life Science Assoc., BIOTECanada, and the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO).
PharmaVentures
PharmaVentures is a corporate finance and transactions advisory firm that has served hundreds of clients worldwide in relation to their strategic deal making in the pharmaceutical, life science and healthcare sectors. Our key offerings include: Transactions / deal negotiations; Product / technology valuations; Deal term advice; Due diligence & expert reports; Strategy formulation; Alliance management; and Expert opinion for litigation/arbitration cases. PharmaVentures provides the global expertise to ensure our clients generate the highest possible return on investment from all their deal making activities. We have experience of all therapeutic areas and can offer advice on both product and technology commercialisation.
Technology Vision Group
Technology Vision Group : Since 1992, TVG has been connecting innovators and leaders in the life science industry across the US, Canada, China, Europe, Australia, Latin America, India, and Asia. TVG enables a global network that supports life science companies as they build new relationships, enter new markets, and create new products. TVG's 19-year track record (1992-2011) of success is founded on its deep industry knowledge, integrity in business, and powerful network of valuable relationships. TVG are judged by the company they keep and have helped over 3,200 life science companies achieve their business goals. TVG continues to expand their network into new markets in Latin America, China, and India fulfilling vision to be "Your Global Life Science Network"".